A new global standard to foster innovation

The ISO 50501 standard relates to the topic of innovation management and is expected to be launched in 2018 to provide the world’s first common standard for innovation processes. Experts from 47 countries have worked on this guideline for several years. They plan to endow companies with tools they can use to map their innovation management processes. Innovation management principles will describe what characterizes an innovative organization and will operate as guidelines for improvement. https://www.itonics.de/2017/12/new-iso-50501-to-foster-innovations/

Continue reading →

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (11 votes, average: 4.91 out of 5)

North Sydney Innovation Network events

North Sydney Innovation Network events

GUTE-URLS

Wordpress is loading infos from meetup

Please wait for API server guteurls.de to collect data from
www.meetup.com/NorthSydneyInn...

urlpreviewbox url= “https://www.meetup.com/NorthSydneyInnovation/”

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (3 votes, average: 4.33 out of 5)

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (7 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (8 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

10 Personal Innovation Lessons

Yes, innovation is extremely difficult. That’s why I love it actually. My personal mission is to simplify innovation so you, your colleagues and/or clients will be able to master innovation yourself. “How can I become a successful innovator?” is the most asked question to me offstage, after a keynote on innovation. Most people are well aware that their organisations are not able to stand still in this fast paced business environment. But a lot of people don’t know how to start innovation. Most of them are afraid to fail, ending up by doing nothing, until doing nothing is a bigger risk. That’s why I like to share with you ten personal innovation lessons to inspire you to become a successful innovator. Lesson 1: “Organisations frustrate their most innovative employees.” – Organisations are rules by best practices, procedures and regulations, which is completely understandable as they want to be the best in class in their current product-market combinations. As innovator you are continuously tweaking present offerings and coming up with completely new concepts. The unfortunate thing is that they hardly ever fit present best practices, procedures and regulations. Sometimes you get the impression that everybody within the company tries to stop you, instead of giving you a helping hand. Companies really know how to frustrate their most innovative employees. Innovation is always a struggle. My personal lessons learned was that I just needed ‘to learn to love the struggle’. That helped a lot. Lesson 2: “Most Managers behave like dogs. They bark at what they do not know.” – Or should I say “Most people….”? How do you behave yourself when someone reaches out to you to tell a great new idea? Do you really listen? Do you ask questions to understand what it’s really about? Do you postpone your own judgement? No. Most of us don’t. Something new never fits in our known patterns and routines. When dogs see something they don’t know they get frightened and start to bark. We humans are so alike :-). Lesson 3:”Managers say yes to innovation only if doing nothing is a bigger risk.” – The chance that a front-end innovation project actually becomes a success on the market is one out of seven. Why should a top manager say yes to innovations with a high risk as long as low-risk line/brand extensions will still do the job? He or she won’t. No, most managers say yes to innovation if doing nothing is a bigger risk. Lessons 4: “A manager wants to control innovation and that’s where it ends. A leader leads innovation and that’s where it starts.” – Managing innovation in a controlling way will never work, because per definition real innovation is a high risk venture with many uncertainties. If you manage real innovations like ‘a normal project’, it will never work. Getting an idea to the market takes a long time and the process is full of iterations. Trying to control it, in a conventional PRINCE-like structure will kill it for sure. Lesson 5: “Real innovative leaders give both focus and freedom.” – Leading innovation by giving both focus and freedom works much better. As leader make sure that your teams focus on the right strategic priorities and know what you expect from them. On the other hand, to be effective, you must give them freedom. Freedom to do it in an unorthodox way, with unorthodox partners, which keeps the passion of your innovators high. Lesson 6: Innovation is not a person or a department. It’s a mindset.” – When you outsource innovation to a person or to a department most of the times nothing materialises. Innovation affects the total internal value chain, and everybody is involved. It’s all about creating an innovative mindset: a way of thinking open to the world around you, which sparks new ideas and gives you the energy to take action. Lesson 7: “You can invent alone, but you can’t innovate alone.” – How many people do you need in your organization to get a new concept from idea to market launch? Right. A lot of people. You can come up with an idea on your own. but you need a lot of colleagues to develop it, to produce it, to do the logistics, to do the sales and of course do the invoicing for it. So connect your colleagues in your innovation project from the start. When they are co-creators they will be the strongest supporters. Lesson 8: “The best innovators are need seekers.” – Need Seekers, such as Apple and Procter & Gamble, make a point of engaging customers directly to generate new ideas. They develop new products and services based on superior end-user understanding. Studies confirm that following a Need Seekers strategy offers the greatest potential for superior performance in the long term. Need seeking is essential, because a good innovation is a simple solution to a relevant customer need. Lesson 9: “Think outside the box and present your idea inside the box otherwise nothing happens.” – Of course you are expected to break patterns. And originality helps. But when you present your idea it is wise to keep in mind that the rest of the organization is still as conservative as ever. Your senior management might praise you for your creativity. But, will they buy the idea and give you the resources to develop it after seeing a movie, a mock up or a flash mob? I have my doubts. Don’t bring them ideas, bring them business and growth potential! Lesson 10: “If there’s no urgency, innovation is considered as playtime.” – Most people in your organisation focus on the business of today. An innovation will only pay off tomorrow. A lot of companies consider innovation as ‘nice to have’, although they will hesitate to say this out loud. It’s considered by many executives as playtime, as long as there’s no urgency. That’s why in cost cutting programmes innovation will be one of the first activities to be killed. I wish you lots of success on your personal innovation journey. Please share your own innovation lessons  as a comment. by Gijs van Wulfen -Inspiring you to master innovation Also published in Innovation in Australia, BSI Innovation — Do you want to improve your personal innovation skills? Check out this hands-on training April 2017 in the proven FORTH […]

Continue reading →

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (8 votes, average: 4.88 out of 5)

Innovation is Combination

Much has been made about the difference between innovation and invention. One writer went as far as to argue that Steve Jobs development of the iPod wasn’t an innovation because it was dependent on so much that came before it. A real innovation, so the argument goes, must be truly transformational, like the IBM PC, which created an entire industry. The problem with these kind of word games is that they lead us to an infinite regress. The IBM PC can be seen as the logical extension of the microchip, which was the logical extension of the transistor. These, in turn, rose in part through earlier developments, such Turing’s universal computer and the completely irrational science of quantum mechanics. The truth is that innovation is never a single event, but happens when fundamental concepts combine with important problems to create an impact. Traditionally, that’s been done within a particular organization or field, but to come up with breakthrough ideas in the 21st century, we increasingly need to transcend conventional boundaries of company and industry. Transforming Alchemy Into Chemistry Everybody knows the story of Benjamin Franklin and his famous kite, but few have ever heard of John Dalton and his law of multiple proportions. What Dalton noticed was that if you combine two or more elements, the weight resulting compound will be proportional to its components. That may seem vague, but it did more for electricity than Franklin ever did. The reason that Dalton’s obscure law became so important is that it led him to invent the modern concept of atoms and, in doing so, transformed the strange art of alchemy into the hard science of chemistry. Once matter could be reduced down to a single, fundamental concept, it could be combined to make new and wondrous things. Dmitri Mendeleev transformed Dalton’s insight into the periodic table, transforming the lives of high school students and major chemical corporations alike. Michael Faraday’s chemical experiments led to his development of the dynamo and the electric motor, which in turn led to Edison’s electric light, modern home appliances and even IBM’s PC and Apple’s iPod. Which of these are inventions and which are innovations? It’s impossible to tell and silly to argue about. What’s clear is none are the product of a single idea, but are all combinations of ideas built on the foundation that Dalton created. Merging Man and Machine In the early 1960s, IBM made what was perhaps the biggest gamble in corporate history. Although it was already the clear leader in the computer industry, it invested $5 billion — in 1960 dollars, worth more than $30 billion today — on a new line of computers, the 360 series, which would make all of its existing products obsolete. The rest, as the say, is history. The 360 series was more than just a product, it was a whole new way of thinking about computers. Before, computers were highly specialized machines designed to do specific jobs. IBM’s new product line, however, offered a wide range of capabilities, allowing customers to add to their initial purchase as their business grew. It would dominate the industry for decades. When Fred Brooks, who led the project, looked back a half century later, he said that the most important decision he made was to switch from a 6-bit byte to an 8-bit byte, which enabled the use of lowercase letters. Considering the size of the investment and the business it created, that may seem like a minor detail. But consider this: That single decision merged the language of machines with the language of humans into a fundamental unit. In effect, the 8-bit byte transformed computers from obscure calculating machines into a collaboration tool. Learning The Language of Life Much like Dalton came up with the fundamental unit of chemistry, a century later Wilhelm Johannsen developed the fundamental unit of biology in 1909: the gene. This too was a combination — and also a refinement — of earlier ideas from men like Charles Darwin, Gregor Mendel and others. However, for scientists of the early twentieth century, a gene was little more than a concept. No one knew what a gene was made of or even where they could be found. It was little more of an abstract idea until Watson and Crick discovered the structure and function of DNA. Even then, there was little we could do with genes except know that they were there. That changed when the Human Genome Project was completed in 2003 and unleashed the new field of genomics. Today, genetic treatments for cancer have become common and, with prices for genetic sequencing falling faster than those for computer chips, we can expect gene therapies to be applied to a much wider array of ailments over the next decade. Yet these new developments are not the product of just biologists. The challenges of gene mapping required massive computing power. So researchers working on genes needed to work closely with computer scientists to put supercomputers to work helping to solve the problem. A New Era of Innovation The confusion about innovation and invention reflects a fundamental misunderstanding about how innovation really works. The idea that certain ideas are flashes of divine inspiration while others are merely riffs off of earlier tunes sung long ago fails to recognize that all innovations are combinations. Over the last century, most inventions have been combinations of fundamental units. Many important products, from household goods to miracle cures, have been developed through combining atoms in new and important ways. Learning how to combine bytes of information gave rise to the computer industry and we’re now learning how to combine genes. The 21st century, however, will give rise to a new era of innovation in which we combine not just fundamental elements, but entire fields of endeavor. As Dr. Angel Diaz, IBM’s VP of Cloud Technology & Architecture told me, “We need computer scientists working with cancer scientists, with climate scientists and with experts in many other fields to tackle grand challenges and make large impacts on the world.” Today, it takes more than just a big idea to innovate. Increasingly, collaboration is becoming a key competitive advantage because you need to combine ideas from widely disparate fields. So if you want to innovate, don’t sit around waiting for a great eureka moment — look for what you can combine […]

Continue reading →

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (9 votes, average: 4.56 out of 5)

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (9 votes, average: 4.56 out of 5)

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (12 votes, average: 4.33 out of 5)

What do we mean by “innovation”?

bike path

While innovation is now very topical it doesn’t appear to be a well understood term. Some people support innovation, others are frightened of it and many just don’t care- they think it’s someone else’s responsibility. Innovation is interpreted differently in different situations hence some difficulties in communication between different groups such as academia and industry which could impede progress. Some forward-thinking members of the LinkedIn Group Innovation Management (approx 40,000 members around the world)  recently suggested general definitions and  voted on them. There are 33 definitions in the list below. Interestingly some said we shouldn’t have a general definition, that it’s specific to the situation. One member also said “Everyone loves innovation but no one wants to change”. For those of you who are interested in a general definition the 2 favourites are below followed by the definitions proposed. Top definitions 30. The result of a creative process that creates value for society 11.  The process of bringing new, problem-solving ideas into use Definitions proposed. 1. Anything that improves anything 2. Ideas applied successfully 3. New ideas, successfully applied 4. Doing things in a new way, or creating new things, that have a significant impact. 5. The creative development of solutions to real and important problems of customers, which are profitably brought to market 6. The beneficial utilization of knowledge and creativity, in order to discover and realize what does not yet exist. 7. The creation of value from ideas (which are new to you) 8.  A successfully implemented and widely accepted invention, which can be material and non-material, an object, process, phenomenon and/or their combination. 9. Creative thinking that adds value, or in two words, meaningfully unique 10. Creation of a viable new offering 11. The process of bringing new, problem-solving ideas into use. 12. Creating new value or capturing value in new ways 13. The actual use of a nontrivial change and improvement in a process, product or system that is novel to the institution developing the change 14. Profitable change 15. The act of introducing something new in something or in somewhere. 16. An idea that meets its market 17. Activity that brings a new repeatable (scalable) concept to customers.” 18. Research is the transformation of money into knowledge. Innovation is the transfer of knowledge back into money 19. The process of creating a product or service solution that delivers significant new customer value 20. The process of idea realisation 21. The result of: connect ideas from different sectors + current insights + solve a pain point 22. New business with new money 23. Successful commercialisation of an idea which adds value to any stakeholder 24. A change in culture. 25. Creating progress that brings important improvement in our quality of life. 26. The process of taking an idea from a state of Conception to a state of Commercialization (value creation 27. Successful adoption* of value-added change** (novelty) in economic, social and environmental spheres 28. The successful usage of new ideas or ways to fulfill certain needs. 29. Something new or different that provides greater value or benefit. 30. The result of a creative process that creates value for society 31. The use of new ideas, or existing ideas in a new context, to result in change which delivers value 32. Commercializing novel ideas 33. Created value for social change Photo: A new glow in the dark bike path in Canberra Australia. www.ideaspies.com/glow-in-the-dark-bike-paths/

Continue reading →

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (16 votes, average: 4.63 out of 5)

Australia: Creativity 1 Innovation 19

Australia is ranked no. 1 on Creativity and no. 19 on Innovation worldwide.  The Creativity score is based on the Global Creativity Index 2015 which ranked Australia as the top country in the world. This result was based on 3 “T”s (technology, talent and tolerance) and connects well with the Australian Ideas Boom.  Many find this result surprising. Taking a positive view it indicates that we have significant potential for innovation The Innovation score is based on the Global Innovation Index 2016 produced by the World Intellectual Property Organisation which ranked Australia 19.  Our challenge is to keep our creativity ranking and to improve our innovation ranking. But why the difference in the first place? We can quickly guess that we’re not good at commercialising ideas in Australia. The 2015 Startup Muster research report said that getting funding is the most reported external challenge for Australian startups (40%). Funding is usually only open to ideas with a profitability model and a track record. There is little investment at the seed level in Australia. The only investors that will take a risk on an idea alone are seed investors, maybe early stage investors if you’re really lucky, and these investors are hard to convince in Australia.  So how do we improve our innovation rating? There are organisations that aim to foster innovation. For example the CSIRO has introduced a program called ON to create stronger connections between sci-tech researchers and commercialisation partners and help ensure the brightest ideas are realised then succeed on the world stage. The next ON Accelerate program commences in January 2017 and you can register interest at ON. An Australian Government Senate enquiry, published in December last year, considered the Australian innovation system, describing innovation as “ideas applied successfully”, and recommended that: -investment in research and development is increased and that funding is predictable and secure -an independent government agency is established with a consistent approach to innovation policy across the whole of government -measures to enhance collaboration and the free flow of knowledge between the university system and the private sector are introduced -the role of local and regional innovation ecosystems is reinforced and -the education system has a central focus in the long-term innovation strategy, thereby acknowledging the central importance of the interplay between the STEM subjects and the humanities, social sciences and creative industries. A further report is being planned which will hopefully progress these recommendations. IdeaSpies is new platform to encourage innovation by encouraging us to see the clever ideas around us. You can see, rate, share and post inspiring clever ideas on this platform which stimulates creativity as a basis for innovation. The ideas that are posted are explained simply. They’re shown by category – artistic, dining, healthcare, NFP and well-being. You can rate them- the site shows the most popular as well as the most recent. You can subscribe to get ideas weekly. You can also register/login to comment on ideas as well as post ideas you see. There’s currently a competition on the site to encourage you to share ideas. Ideas and feedback are very welcome. Lynn Wood Chief Idea Spy IdeaSpies

Continue reading →

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (8 votes, average: 4.38 out of 5)

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (9 votes, average: 4.89 out of 5)

Getting real about innovation

Getting real about innovation

Innovation is for more than just start ups and tech businesses—it can be as simple as adding wheels to a suitcase. But the overuse of the word ‘innovation’ has some businesspeople scratching their head at what successful innovation really is. Antony Funnell searches for an answer. Mark Dodgson has spent a significant chunk of his career studying the concept of innovation. He’s written extensively about it, lectured all over the world on its application and spent many a long hour puzzling over why some organisations are more innovative than others. Innovation affects everybody and it really should be on the agenda for everybody to think about. PROFESSOR MARK DODGSON, UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND And at the end of all that effort, he still thinks it’s a pretty crap term. ‘It’s a terribly vague word,’ he says. ‘It’s an act and a fact. It’s a noun and a verb. I’ve heard it described as an “aerosol” word which you spray in the air and everyone smells it and it smells great and lovely but you can’t grab hold of it.’ Dodgson is the director of the Technology and Innovation Centre at the University of Queensland and a visiting professor at Imperial College Business School in London. ‘I go for a simple definition, and that simple definition is new ideas, successfully applied,’ he says. In other words, the secret to successful innovation, Dodgson theorises, is in the application as much as the invention. ‘It’s about putting ideas into practice [and] making them useful,’ he says. Innovation affects everybody The Brookings Institution’s Scott Andes agrees, and he bemoans the term’s overuse. ‘It seems every conference or article about technology or the economy employs the term, and usually to different ends,’ he says. That lack of clarity, says Dodgson, makes it difficult for ordinary people to see the relevance of innovation in their daily lives. Too often, he says, it’s simply associated with ‘start-up’ firms and new gadgets. ‘It’s used very loosely, but it is incredibly important because it really underpins economic growth,’ he says. ‘We live longer and healthier lives as a result of innovation. We have information at our fingertips. Innovation is removing repetitive and dangerous work. ‘Innovation affects everybody and it really should be on the agenda for everybody to think about.’ IMAGE: LUGGAGE AND WHEELS CO-EXISTED SEPARATELY FOR CENTURIES UNTIL AN INNOVATIVE PILOT IN THE 1980S THOUGHT TO COMBINE THEM, INVENTING MODERN SUITCASES AS WE KNOW THEM. (APING VISION/STS/GETTY IMAGES) Crucial to that change, according to Professor Dodgson, is the need for an attitudinal shift on the part of government and business. The corporate sector in Australia talks a lot about innovation, he says, but their record of investment in research and development is low by world standards. Australian managers are not particularly adventurous. Our boards of directors are much more concerned with cost-cutting, efficiencies, rather than investing for the future,’ he says. ‘Often in this whole area of innovation and R&D, it’s not a question of how much you spend, but spending it wisely, astutely.’ That also includes a role for government. Dodgson points to Silicon Valley as a good example of strategic government practice. Contrary to the arguments put forward by economic rationalists, governments in the United States have long played a central role in fostering the phenomenal success of America’s high-end technology sector. ‘The iPhone, which is perceived as being an invention that came out of Apple laboratories and research—if you trace back where those ideas came from, it was government-funded research,’ he says. ‘If you look at the venture capital industry in America, the largest investor in early-stage venture capital in America is the government. The government puts twice as much money into the venture capital industry at early-stage than the private sector.’ Getting government on board Andes argues governments and other funding bodies also need to be far more sophisticated in the way they think about the innovation process. He says most economists and policy makers are focussed on what he calls the ‘formal’ model of innovation—one that starts with a research institute or university at one end of the line, and ends with the commercialisation of their discoveries at the other end. But that linear approach, says Andes, no longer reflects the reality of modern innovation-increasingly industry specific, often not connected to a laboratory, and usually involving a variety of actors. ‘There is a lot of research that shows that companies actually learn from each other, they learn from partnerships, they learn from suppliers, and they learn from customers, through feedback and other mechanisms,’ he says. ‘And this really drives a nontrivial amount of innovation in the economy.’ Added to that, he says there’s often a failure to understand that the process of innovation isn’t always radical, that it can be incremental. ‘Consider a car manufacturer learning from the company that makes wheels for them how to use a lighter metal,’ Andes says. ‘It’s a small, incremental innovation, but it may save a lot of money, it may save energy, it may reduce manufacturing costs. These are the types of things we see through informal and incremental innovation, and often they are just as important or more important.’ Did you know Future Tense is also a podcast? Subscribe on iTunes, the ABC Radio app or your favourite podcasting app and listen later. In that vein, economist Jason Murphy warns against the popular political view that all modern innovation should in some way be digital or have a high-tech component. Murphy nominates the “wheel-a-board” as one of his favourite examples of successful recent innovation. ‘Trunks and suitcases had been invented for millions of years along with the wheel, and it wasn’t until the 1980s that the two concepts were brought together,’ he says. ‘Now of course, everyone in the airport is dragging along their luggage on little wheels. It goes to show that yes, you can make an incremental improvement to a product that has been out there for a very long time and make a big, big difference. ‘There is a great deal of really economically important innovation that doesn’t really have anything to do with invention … Innovation is important when it is adopted broadly, not just when it is invented.’ The downside of innovation Dodgson says it’s crucial to acknowledge that the process of change always brings losers as well as winners. As […]

Continue reading →

Rate Idea

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (8 votes, average: 4.50 out of 5)