Carbon Nanotube Yarn – Electricity Generation from Body Movement

carbon-nanotube-640x0

Carbon nanotube yarn could help create battery-free wearables, powered entirely by their users’ movement. Imagine being able to harness the energy produced during your morning jog and using it to power a music player or fitness tracker. Researchers have developed a special ultra-thin yarn created from carbon nanotubes. It efficiently converts mechanical energy into electrical energy. The yarn can be twisted into elastic-like coils that allow the threads to generate electricity when stretched. The energy from one piece of yarn can generate 250 watts per kilogram when a number of them are bound together and stretched 30 times per second. https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/carbon-nanotube-yarn/

Continue reading →

Rate this idea!

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

A Lab Accident Leads to Bioactive “Tissue Paper”

Bio Tissue Paper

A spill of bioactive ink made from ovarian cells led to the creation of paper made from organs and tissues, with various potential medical uses. The discovery happened, as so many discoveries do, by accident. Adam Jakus, then a postdoctoral researcher in materials science at Northwestern University, was working with the biological “ink” his lab uses to 3D print ovaries. Standing beneath the lab’s fume hood, Jakus knocked over the container, spilling it onto the lab bench. By the time he went to clean it up, it had formed a solid sheet so strong it can be folded into origami. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/lab-accident-leads-bioactive-tissue-paper-180964511/?

Continue reading →

Rate this idea!

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (3 votes, average: 4.67 out of 5)

Skin surface nanochip for healing injuries or organ regrowth.

electric skin chip

A new device that reprograms skin cells could represent a breakthrough in repairing injured or ageing tissue. The new technique, called tissue nanotransfection, is based on a tiny device that sits on the surface of living skin. An intense, focused electric field is applied to the device, allowing it to deliver genes to the skin cells beneath it – turning them into different types of cells. This is an exciting opportunity when it comes to repairing damaged tissue – turning a patient’s own tissue into a “bioreactor” to produce cells to either repair nearby tissues, or for use at another site. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/aug/07/nanochip-could-heal-injuries-or-regrow-organs-with-one-touch-say-researchers

Continue reading →

Rate this idea!

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Lighter washing machine that reduces CO2 emissions.

halo washer

A Nottingham Trent University student has discovered a simple trick to cut the weight of washing machines, making them easier to move and more environmentally friendly. Most washing machines have a 25kg block of concrete near the top to hold the machine steady during a spin cycle. This significantly adds to the weight of the appliance. Much CO2 is released during the production of concrete and more is released by gas powered transport vehicles. This simple change would replace the heavy concrete counterweight with an empty plastic container that is filled with water when the washing machine is installed. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/08/04/students-simple-washing-machine-idea-could-save-thousands-tonnes

Continue reading →

Rate this idea!

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (4 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Vertical Farming. Turning your walls into gardens for year-round harvest.

vertical farming

In the largest agriculture-tech funding round in history, vertical farming startup “Plenty” attracted US$200 million. Some experts say the investment could make the indoor farming industry more viable as a whole. Instead of growing greens outdoors, the farm grows its food on glowing, LED-lit 20-foot-tall towers inside a former electronics distribution center in South San Francisco. The towers don’t require pesticides or natural sunlight. The technique is called indoor vertical farming. Food grows on trays or hanging modules in a climate-controlled, indoor facility. The process is revolutionary. Certain types of food could be produced year-round, anywhere, in a small space. http://www.businessinsider.com/food-investment-vertical-farming-2017-8/

Continue reading →

Rate this idea!

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

Food from Electricity? Shocking new way to deal with world hunger.

electric food spoon

A Finnish research team has taken a step towards the future of food by developing a method for producing food from electricity. If scaling it up proves to be successful, it could help in the fight against world hunger and climate change. The researchers created a batch of single-cell protein that is nutritious enough to serve for dinner using a system powered by renewable energy. The process requires electricity, water, carbon dioxide, and microbes. After exposing the raw materials to electrolysis in a bioreactor, a powder forms consisting of protein and carbohydrates. Textures can also be changed by altering microbes. https://futurism.com/a-team-of-scientists-just-made-food-from-electricity-and-it-could-be-the-solution-to-world-hunger/

Continue reading →

Rate this idea!

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (6 votes, average: 4.83 out of 5)

Turning plants into batteries and house lamps.

living-light-796x467

Imagine a lamp. Any lamp. Now imagine having to water it. Dutch product designer Ermi van Oers created Living Light: plants that double as lights. Or lights that double as plants – whichever way you prefer looking at it. The lights run on electricity generated by bacteria in the soil. Healthier plants produce more energy. If you take care of it properly, the Living Light will produce up to 0.1 mW. Enough to use it as a night lamp, but not sufficient to properly light a room. Imagine if we could use boulevard trees for powering street lights?

Continue reading →

Rate this idea!

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (4 votes, average: 4.50 out of 5)